How to Convert Conversations at Networking Events to Instructions

Two-way introductions are vital – who are you speaking to and why are they here?

Have you been to networking events that are a waste of time because you have not maintained contact with anyone after the event, or obtained work?

This is often down to how we introduce our work, and ourselves as well as how we follow up with our new contacts after the event.

When circulating in a crowd, the pressure is on to be interesting and stand out. A lot to ask for in a short time, considering we form our impressions of others within around 7 seconds.

How can you feel and sound totally confident when introducing yourself? The key is to prepare (and practice) your introduction so that it is relevant to the audience and elicits curiosity, as well as being memorable.

I have three tips for you to get started. You can use these individually, or craft an introduction combining the three. It will help if you understand who your new contact is and what they do first so you can tailor your introduction accordingly.

How does your service meet a business need?

1. Use the ‘help/enable’ approach to make your intro all about your clients (or potential clients). You can use this formula:

I help/enable …. To do or understand….. achieve this result.

For example, “I enable lawyers to master their business skills so that they can serve more clients profitably”.

2. Do you have any success statistics that you could drop into your introduction? For example, “my success rate in litigation is 100%” or “In the first half of this year I achieved 100% satisfaction rating from my clients”. Statistics are a great way to build credibility – just keep it to one or two in your first conversation. It is not meant to be a shopping list of all the awards you have won.

3. The power of three. Take a service you want to promote to the audience and include three key messages. For example:

–  Cost: Fixed fee/Value offered/Benefit to them

–  Experience of legal staff involved on their behalf

–  Service: What’s included that is exceptional/of interest?

A mutual exchange of contact details makes sure any follow up is in your control

Consider also how you will follow up with a further conversation after the formal part of the networking proceedings. Taking the initiative to exchange and ask for a business card will ensure you have the details for a follow up with a phone call. This should be a continuation of the conversation you have started not a cold sell.

The above techniques are taken from my Business Brilliance Blueprint® Programme where we review your specific business challenges to serve more clients. The aim of this programme is to help you leverage your time and money to propel you and your service towards your ideal client(s).

There are two options: You can have a 2 hour workshop which provides a lot more practical tools called Techniques to convert enquires into Instructions’ at your office or join the full programme (in Leeds) to fully master your business skills for profitable practice for the future. Visit the website for full details or contact me here or via my mobile: 07921 540039.

Main Image Attribution: Artist: Phil Lang, Open Data Institute: Knowledge for Everyone

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2 thoughts on “How to Convert Conversations at Networking Events to Instructions

  • July 22, 2017 at 6:47 am
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    Thanks for sharing your three introduction tips. Most lawyers will just say something like “I am a family law solicitor and I work for ……..”. They will have missed the opportunity contained within your three tips to make themselves stand out from the crowd and also to create an ongoing conversation that makes them memorable.

    I would like to add in to follow up and connect on LinkedIn and build that meaningful conversation.

    Reply
  • July 23, 2017 at 8:13 am
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    Thank you Rachel for your comment, and I agree follow up is crucial. I also teach my lawyers, up here in Yorkshire, about how to build relationships using linkedIn or the social media tools depending on where their clients ‘hang out’, including conversion techniques. It is important to be able to connect both in the virtual and physical world. Ann

    Reply

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